Reconciliation Lethbridge

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The Reconciliation Lethbridge Advisory Committee (or Reconciliation Lethbridge) is a committee of Lethbridge City Council that was formally created in 2018.

The role of the committee is to act as an advisory body to City Council on issues relating to reconciliation, as well as to advance reconciliation initiatives within the broader community.

Key activities performed by the committee include championing the City's Reconciliation Implementation Plan and hosting the annual Reconciliation Week (typically the third week in September).

The Reconciliation Lethbridge Get Involved Lethbridge page is an opportunity to highlight and share information on projects and initiatives that relate to reconciliation in Lethbridge. It is also a platform for the public to participate in ongoing project-specific conversations.

The Reconciliation Lethbridge Advisory Committee (or Reconciliation Lethbridge) is a committee of Lethbridge City Council that was formally created in 2018.

The role of the committee is to act as an advisory body to City Council on issues relating to reconciliation, as well as to advance reconciliation initiatives within the broader community.

Key activities performed by the committee include championing the City's Reconciliation Implementation Plan and hosting the annual Reconciliation Week (typically the third week in September).

The Reconciliation Lethbridge Get Involved Lethbridge page is an opportunity to highlight and share information on projects and initiatives that relate to reconciliation in Lethbridge. It is also a platform for the public to participate in ongoing project-specific conversations.

  • "Oki" becomes the City of Lethbridge's Official Greeting

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    9 months ago

    City Council adopts Oki as official City of Lethbridge greeting

    The traditional Blackfoot greeting “Oki” has now been adopted as the official greeting of the City of Lethbridge.

    City Council voted unanimously in favour of passing the official business resolution brought forward by Mayor Chris Spearman. The adoption of the greeting is an important step towards honouring the original peoples of the land the city is built on says Mayor Chris Spearman.

    “What better way to kick-off Reconciliation Week in Lethbridge than by recognizing the traditional Blackfoot greeting as our city welcome,” says Spearman. “As we move towards deepening reconciliation...

    City Council adopts Oki as official City of Lethbridge greeting

    The traditional Blackfoot greeting “Oki” has now been adopted as the official greeting of the City of Lethbridge.

    City Council voted unanimously in favour of passing the official business resolution brought forward by Mayor Chris Spearman. The adoption of the greeting is an important step towards honouring the original peoples of the land the city is built on says Mayor Chris Spearman.

    “What better way to kick-off Reconciliation Week in Lethbridge than by recognizing the traditional Blackfoot greeting as our city welcome,” says Spearman. “As we move towards deepening reconciliation in our own community, it is important to acknowledge how big of a role language plays in continuing the Blackfoot culture in our city.”

    The United Nations declared 2019 the Year of Indigenous Language and acknowledges there are more than 70 Indigenous languages across 12 language groups currently spoken in Canada. Blackfoot is the most widely spoken Indigenous language in Lethbridge.

    Language plays an important role in the way connections are made with one another. Key amongst those connections includes transfer of knowledge, celebration of culture and welcoming those from outside the community.

    Further to the adoption of Oki as the official greeting, City Council instructed administration to prepare a submission to the next Capital Improvement Program to identify opportunities to incorporate Blackfoot and where appropriate other Indigenous languages within City facilities, parks and neighbourhoods for Council’s consideration.


  • City Heritage Planning Project Shortlisted for International Planning Award

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    9 months ago

    The City of Lethbridge's Traditional Knowledge and Use Assessment (TKUA) study has been selected as one of only 10 projects from across the Commonwealth to be shortlisted for a 2019 Commonwealth Association of Planners Award for Outstanding Planning Achievement in the Commonwealth.

    This project, which created the City's first baseline understanding of Indigenous cultural heritage, was the result of an innovative partnership between three Blackfoot Confederacy First Nations of Kainai, Piikani and Siksika, The City of Lethbridge and Arrow Archaeology.

    The intention of the project was to enhance planning and decision-making as it relates to Indigenous cultural heritage in Lethbridge...

    The City of Lethbridge's Traditional Knowledge and Use Assessment (TKUA) study has been selected as one of only 10 projects from across the Commonwealth to be shortlisted for a 2019 Commonwealth Association of Planners Award for Outstanding Planning Achievement in the Commonwealth.

    This project, which created the City's first baseline understanding of Indigenous cultural heritage, was the result of an innovative partnership between three Blackfoot Confederacy First Nations of Kainai, Piikani and Siksika, The City of Lethbridge and Arrow Archaeology.

    The intention of the project was to enhance planning and decision-making as it relates to Indigenous cultural heritage in Lethbridge, as well as to deepen the City's understanding of Blackfoot land use and culture.

    We invite you to watch the TKUA project video to learn more.


  • Lethbridge City Council Proclaim October 4, 2019 "Sisters in Spirit Day"

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    9 months ago

    On September 16, 2019 Lethbridge City Council unanimously proclaimed October 4, 2019 to be "Sisters in Spirit Day".

    This proclamation, leading up to the 13th annual Sisters in Spirit walk and vigil in Lethbridge, goes a long way to honour and acknowledge Indigenous women and girls who have been victims of violencein our community and region, as well as their families.

    “When we uplift the most vulnerable in our community and when we reach out and support each other, it makes the community better for everyone,” says Lethbridge City Councillor Belinda Crowson. “So it doesn’t matter who you are and...

    On September 16, 2019 Lethbridge City Council unanimously proclaimed October 4, 2019 to be "Sisters in Spirit Day".

    This proclamation, leading up to the 13th annual Sisters in Spirit walk and vigil in Lethbridge, goes a long way to honour and acknowledge Indigenous women and girls who have been victims of violencein our community and region, as well as their families.

    “When we uplift the most vulnerable in our community and when we reach out and support each other, it makes the community better for everyone,” says Lethbridge City Councillor Belinda Crowson. “So it doesn’t matter who you are and where you come from, we need to all support each other and make a better future for everyone.”

    Community members are invited to participate in the Sisters in Spirit march beginning at City Hall at 6:30pm followed by a walk to Galt Gardens for a vigil at 7pm.

  • Downtown Project Celebrates Blackfoot Language

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    9 months ago

    Downtown Lethbridge is proudly located within the territory of the SIKSIKAITSITAPI, the Blackfoot Confederacy.

    The United Nations declared 2019 to be the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Indigenous languages and their speakers are being lost at an alarming rate, which has a direct impact on the transmission of culture and knowledge within all communities, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. Language also plays a significant role in place-making, identity and wellness.

    Promoting Blackfoot and all Indigenous languages spoken in Lethbridge contributes to the well-being of our community and helps us to celebrate the values and culture that make Sikóóhkotok (Lethbridge) unique. The Heart...

    Downtown Lethbridge is proudly located within the territory of the SIKSIKAITSITAPI, the Blackfoot Confederacy.

    The United Nations declared 2019 to be the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Indigenous languages and their speakers are being lost at an alarming rate, which has a direct impact on the transmission of culture and knowledge within all communities, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. Language also plays a significant role in place-making, identity and wellness.

    Promoting Blackfoot and all Indigenous languages spoken in Lethbridge contributes to the well-being of our community and helps us to celebrate the values and culture that make Sikóóhkotok (Lethbridge) unique. The Heart of our City Committee and the Reconciliation Lethbridge Advisory Committee invite you to learn more about the languages and cultures of the Indigenous peoples who call this City home, starting with the original Blackfoot greeting of this territory, OKI.

    A new project has been unveiled and is set to tour the Downtown in celebration of Indigenous language and Reconciliation Week.

    The three-dimensional word "Oki", the traditional Blackfoot greeting, has been created in celebration of the United Nations year of Indigenous Language.

    The unique collaboration between the Reconciliation Lethbridge Advisory Committee (RLAC) and the Heart of Our City Committee (HOCC) was designed and manufactured in Lethbridge, is made to be mobile and will be moved around the downtown for different events and celebrations.

    Jordan Head, who is member of both the HOCC and RLAC says the funding provided by HOCC was a natural step for the committee as it aligns with one of the committee's key values.

    "The Heart of Our City Committee hopes to celebrate and bring greater awareness to the fact that Downtown, like the rest of Lethbridge, is located on traditional Blackfoot territory," says Head. "We want to continue demonstrating that the Downtown is an open and welcoming environment for a diversity of uses, users, and cultures."

    "We know that language plays a huge part in building community, in the transferal of knowledge and in the empowerment of Indigenous people," says RLAC Co-Chair, Amanda Scout. "The Oki project is a creative and visual way to celebrate our Blackfoot culture in the city and we hope it starts more conversation around Indigenous culture and language."